Beyond the Network – Public Events

 

 

Various Dates – 2017

This page documents events and happenings, actions and debates that reach beyond the initial network to disseminate its ideas and try its findings in a broader context. 

These are opportunities that arose directly or indirectly from the network events, its public engagement, radio broadcasts, participatory elements and other networking activities. They stand in relation to its research questions and aims, and hold the potential for their development beyond the network; and give shape to the testing and application of its findings.

These events are open to a public audience, please see each listing for booking details. Where possible, documentation from past events are uploaded to the listings below.


Listening across Disciplines at the Southampton Science and Engineering Festival 2017

March 18 2017, 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm

University of Southampton

 

As part of Science and Engineering Day at Southampton Science and Engineering Festival (SOTSEF) 2017 the Listening Across Disciplines project hosted a Science Soundwalk (a soundwalk is a walk with a focus on listening to the environment to experience it in a new way) led by Maria Papadomanolaki, a sound artist and experienced soundwalker. The group walked around the festival exploring its different sounds to experience how a focus on listening can enhance experience of this science event. 

Southampton Science and Engineering Festival (SOTSEF) 2017: SOTSEF ran for the entire week of 10th-19th March, to coincide with British Science Week. A host of different science activities happened across the city of Southampton throughout the week. The largest and most anticipated event of SOTSEF was the fifteenth annual Science and Engineering Day that took place at Highfield and Boldrewood campuses of University of Southampton on Saturday the 18th March. Read more.

Images by Anna Barney

Designing solutions: New forms of knowledge creation and dissemination

Panel discussion, Thursday 2 March 2017, 6.30-8pm followed by a drinks reception

London College of Communication

 

This was the second of two open panel discussions which debated Knowledge after Austerity and Brexit 

The first took place at the same time on the 23rd February 2017.

Together they examined knowledge production and dissemination in the context of austerity, and the way in which knowledge has been brought into focus in the atmosphere of the Brexit vote. These panel discussions provided a framework to explore both the challenges and the opportunities that the current political and economic context presents.

Since 2010, the political and economic context for knowledge production in the UK has been transformed. Austerity’s ideological and economic dimensions have led to significant changes in the way that knowledge is produced and disseminated. The impact of fiscal tightening has been felt in numerous ways, from the closure of public libraries, to spending cuts inflicted on the arts, to fundamental changes in the financing of higher education.

In the last year, the EU referendum campaign and its aftermath have given rise to the idea that we are entering a new era of ‘post-truth’ politics in which intellectualism is disparaged and ‘people in this country have had enough of experts’. The outcomes of the referendum and the US presidential election have also focused attention on the financialized nature of digital knowledge production and on the increasing role of algorithms and ‘filter bubbles’ in the organisation of information online.

 

Panel 2: Designing solutions: New forms of knowledge creation and dissemination

The second event discussed emergent projects that sought to design an alternative future for knowledge production in the UK.

• How can knowledge production be re-democratized? 
• What role might practices of co-production and other innovative forms of knowledge creation play? 
• What challenges are faced by emergent projects committed to ‘open’ education and equality of access?
• What should the knowledge institutions of the future look like?

Speakers:
David Cross, Reader in Art and Design, Camberwell College of Arts
Melanie Keen, Director, Iniva
Mor Rubinstein, Community Coordinator, Open Knowledge International
Shiri Shalmy, artist and curator, Antiuniversity Now co-organiser
Tom Wakeford, Reader in Public Science, Coventry University and Lead Practitioner, People’s Knowledge

Chair:
Rebecca Bramall
, Senior Lecturer in Media and Communications, London College of Communication

Book your place now.


For further information contact:
Rebecca Bramall
ku.ca.stra.cclnull@llamarb.r

arts.ac.uk/lcc/events

Image courtesy of Antiuniversity Now and Joseph Berke

The problem with knowledge: Knowledge after austerity and Brexit

Panel discussion, Thursday 23 February 2017, 6.30-8pm followed by a drinks reception

London College of Communication

 

The problem with knowledge was the first of two panel discussions which debated Knowledge after Austerity and Brexit.

The second took place at the same time on the 2nd March 2017. 

Together they examined knowledge production and dissemination in the context of austerity, and the way in which knowledge has been brought into focus in the atmosphere of the Brexit vote. This was the first of two open panel discussions that provided a framework to explore both the challenges and the opportunities that the current political and economic context presents.

Since 2010, the political and economic context for knowledge production in the UK has been transformed. Austerity’s ideological and economic dimensions have led to significant changes in the way that knowledge is produced and disseminated. The impact of fiscal tightening has been felt in numerous ways, from the closure of public libraries, to spending cuts inflicted on the arts, to fundamental changes in the financing of higher education.

In the last year, the EU referendum campaign and its aftermath have given rise to the idea that we are entering a new era of ‘post-truth’ politics in which intellectualism is disparaged and ‘people in this country have had enough of experts’. The outcomes of the referendum and the US presidential election have also focused attention on the financialized nature of digital knowledge production and on the increasing role of algorithms and ‘filter bubbles’ in the organisation of information online.

Panel 1: The problem with knowledge: Knowledge after austerity and Brexit

The first panel discussion focussed on the current landscape and examined the conditions of knowledge production in the UK today.

• How has austerity reconfigured the landscape of knowledge creation?
• What new barriers (or opportunities) to participation in learning have been created?
• How have knowledge institutions been transformed?
• What can Brexit tell us about the value placed on ‘expert’, ‘non-expert’, and other forms of knowledge?

Speakers:
Gargi Bhattacharyya, Professor of Sociology, University of East London
Jamie Burton, public lawyer and Chair of Just Fair
Will Davies, Senior Lecturer in Politics, Goldsmiths University of London
Lauren Smith, co-founder of Voices for the Library and Research Associate, University of Strathclyde
Jeremy Till, Head of Central Saint Martins and Pro-Vice Chancellor of University of the Arts London

Chair:
Salomé Voegelin
, Reader in Sound Arts, London College of Communication

For further information contact:
Rebecca Bramall
ku.ca.stra.cclnull@llamarb.r